Breaking through the Glass Ceiling and onto the Ice

By Michael K. Browne, Assistant Director – Complaint Investigations

Teens Teaching Teens the Life Lesson of Confronting Inequality

Minneapolis Department of Civil Right's Intern Liz Stoneburg sports hockey gear courtesy of Hamline Law's Res Ipsa Hockey Team and Team Captain Sten Schuler. Hamline Law's hockey team welcomes female players.

Minneapolis Department of Civil Right's Intern Liz Stoneburg sports hockey gear courtesy of Hamline Law's Res Ipsa Hockey Team and Team Captain Sten Schuler. Hamline Law's hockey team welcomes female players.

Lexi Peters, of Buffalo, N.Y., recently expressed her frustration with EA Sports’ NHL video game: Lexie couldn’t be herself. While the game allowed male players to create characters in their likeness, the game didn’t have many options for women. So her only alternative was to give the players long hair. Unfortunately, the characters still looked like men on the ice. 

Lexi told the company it was “unfair to women and girl hockey players around the world.” She turned out to be a true game-changer.

This past fall, EA Sports released “NHL 12,” including the option to play women players in the game’s design. In tribute to Lexie, the designers requested a picture of her. The new default female character looks just like her. Players can now change the hair, eye color, uniform and name to create their own likeness.

Lexi is just one example of the power and strength of the younger generation. Children and teens are capable of learning the importance of equality and the right to opportunity and it is imperative that they are taught these values at an early age. Parents, teachers and community leaders should encourage teens to speak out against injustice—because as you now know, one 14-year-old girl can make a big difference.

 “If you have something to say, and you think it’s important, go for it!”

– Lexi Peters

This entry was posted in Civil Rights Department, Complaint Investigations and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Breaking through the Glass Ceiling and onto the Ice

  1. Mary Frances Stoneburg says:

    This is the cutest story ever! What a darling idea and intern!

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